James R. Albertson: Lyin’ from the grave

| November 14, 2012 | 66 Comments

Mary sends us links to the obituaries of James R. Albertson who told his family wild-ass stories about being a POW in Vietnam. She says that after checking the various POW lists, he doesn’t appear on any of them;

Dad was taken prisoner, and he was beaten so badly prior to arriving at his first camp that he has no recollection of what occurred after the Viet Cong surrounded him. He woke to find that many of the others had urinated on him, and in his open wounds. From there they forced him to do things like play Russian roulette, they shot others as he watched… they pried off his finger nails with bamboo sticks. They put him in the Chinese water torcher [sic] table…. and to describe some of his more difficult collections:

Further along his time as a POW, they placed him and 6 others in a bamboo cage that was submerged in a river. Only about 6 inches of air separated them from the top of the cage. The cage was tall enough that you could not stand on the bottom. Your only choices were to swim or hang on to the bamboo door on top. Their cage was guarded 24/7, and if you started to hang onto the top of the cage they would take the butt of their AK-47s and smash your fingers until you let go. Dad said one of them had a finger cut off because he was too weak to let go, and the soldier’s constant beating on his hand caused his finger to be amputated. Then after the first few guys died (which they did not remove bodies from the cage) the mice started showing up and taking bites at those dead and undead in the cage. Dad was the only one to make it out alive. He was able to use some of the dead to help stand so he didn’t have to tread water. They were in that cage for about 2 weeks he said. Their feeding time consisted of rice being thrown into the water for them.

Sounds to me like he watched too many Vietnam movies. A cursory search for those five Purple Hearts he claims he had turned up nothing, not that it means anything since databases aren’t complete, but, you’d think with five of them, one would show up;

So that throws his two Bronze Star Medals “for bravery” into question, too.

Of course, his son says that POW Network calling out his father is because his missions in Vietnam were all classified. Ho-hum. What could possibly be classified about being a POW? The enemy had him, they knew they had him, so how would it be a secret?

Category: Phony soldiers

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  1. Hondo says:

    He doesnt seem to be on any of the lists on this site:

    http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo/vietnam/reports/

    And he doesnt seem to be on the LOC expanded list, either:

    http://lcweb2.loc.gov/frd/pow/pmsea.html

    I can understand his son defending him. Finding out a family member is apparently dishonest and has been lying to you for years is a bitch; people never want to believe that. But that doesn’t change the reality.

    FOIA away.

  2. Chip@NASA says:

    @1 Hondo
    ” I can understand his son defending him. Finding out a family member is dishonest and has been lying to you for years is a bitch. But that doesn’t change reality.”

    Yeah, at least he’s dead.

    /Was that not nice? Should I have not said that?

  3. Ret12B40 says:

    Shit, I saw him in Apocalypse Now, he was serving under Colonel Kurtz!

  4. UpNorth says:

    Ret12, I think I saw him in The Deer Hunter.
    Man this guy got around, I wonder if he was at Hamburger Hill?

  5. Green Thumb says:

    Question: Do you, as an individual PH recipient, have to enroll in the database listed above or is it done automatically or though some pre-established system?

  6. Hondo says:

    Green Thumb: unless I posted the wrong links, both of those are SE Asia PW/MIA database links. I believe those are updated automatically from official sources, but they only reference PW/MIA status in SE Asia. Don’t believe they include anything about PH eligibility.

  7. Steadfast&Loyal says:

    the story was pretty good. I swear he stole that from a movie.

    sucks for his family.

  8. Twist says:

    Apparantly posers think that nobody but them saw “The Deer Hunter”.

  9. Ex-PH2 says:

    Twist beat me to it.

  10. NHSparky says:

    While the son’s post is almost two years old, he finds it impossible to believe 1–a DD214 would/could be faked, 2–someone would award medals (in this case a POW Medal from 2003) they didn’t earn, both of these we’ve seen happen far too many times.

  11. GoddamContractor says:

    The dude doesn’t even have Christopher Walken hair… it’s the little things.

  12. OWB says:

    As horrid as fakers and posers are in general because they besmirk the reputations of all who actually did serve honorably, it must be even worse for the families of the fakers and posers to only discover the lies after the death of their loved one. My heart aches for them.

    The truth, however, is more important than any of our individual feelings. May his son soon discover some level of peace with that knowledge and reconcile his dad’s lies somehow.

  13. Hondo says:

    @13: looks to be a completely different individual from both this guy and his son.

    However, Don Shipley might possibly be interested in the link in comment 13. Anyone have a way to get the above link to Don?

  14. GoddamContractor says:

    @14 Rgr. Was just looking for the FB page of the son and stumbled across the link. Yeah I am bored….

  15. Beretverde says:

    I want to hear about Albertson’s repatriation, and how the flight back to the USA from Hanoi via the Philippines was with the other POWs… or did he escape, and walk out to Cambodia/SVN after killing dozens or so VC/NVA? Maybe all that was classified as well?

    Give me a break.

    The son is understandably delusional…Sometimes you can’t change that, no matter what the facts are.

  16. Just an Old Dog says:

    I want to hear more about these bad-ass amphibious flesh-eating mice.

  17. malclave says:

    @17
    Me too. They might be useful when the Zombie Apocalypse comes.

    the mice started showing up and taking bites at those dead and undead in the cage.

  18. O-4E says:

    That story sounds like my first week in 4-27 Infantry as a PFC. Except weaker. Guy sounds like a pussy.

  19. Craig M. says:

    My Dad only told me he had to walk twenty miles to school uphill both ways.

  20. UpNorth says:

    Craig, it was 20 miles uphill, both ways, in a blizzard, year round. Been there, done that.

  21. maybe all his missions with the Navy Rangers were classified “men in black” and his records were destroyed in a fire….or he’s just full of shit

  22. Squelch2k says:

    @13 I posted the link to Don Shipley’s Extreme Seal page.

  23. LebbenB says:

    I’m always conflicted when stories like this are posted. I detest posers and fakes as much as the rest of you, and have a lot of fun poking them (verbally) in the eye. But doing it to someone recently passed on, I think about a family that’s under a lot of pressure and strain coping with the loss of a family member. I certainly don’t want to add to that strain.

  24. Twist says:

    O-4E, When where you a Wolfhound? I was in 4-27 from 94-97, well until they changed to 2-27.

  25. O-4E says:

    @Twist

    91-late 93. B Company.

    Then I reclassed to 54B under the BEAR thinking I was getting a “high speed” laboratory job. And went to 71st Chem.

    My first indication that I fucked up was when I went to 54B relcass and spent the first 2 weeks on the M-60 MG and M-2.

    Never did get that white lab coat I saw the guy wearing in the video at the Retention Office.

  26. RandomNCO says:

    The only Purple Heart database that I have found myself to be included in was the computer based display they had at the old Fort Benning Infantry Museum, the one on main post and not outside of the gate.

    The few that I have seen online involve having to actually send orders or DD214, which I have yet to do, since it doesn’t really matter to me whether or not my name is on some list, since I doubt anyone is searching for me specifically who doesn’t already know me.

  27. DownSouth says:

    He should have been satisfied with just being a veteran, something to be proud of. Instead he tried to claim the valor of other brave men. He served in Greece 1966-1968 and NEVER set foot in Vietnam, NO Purple Hearts, NO Bronze Stars, NOT a POW. His awards: National Defense Service Medal & Air Force Outstanding Unit Award- nothing else! Shame on you.

  28. DownSouth says:

    This is the complete post by his son:

    “I have two jobs. My parents own a golf car distributorship in Arkansas. On my day’s off I go work for them – voluntarily. I have a strong commitment to my family, and I am willing to do anything that is needed to help any one of my nuclear family members. The family business was started by my grandfather and father. My grandfather and I became very close buddies over my youth. We did everything from fish together, to him teaching me about baseball and golf, to him teaching me about investments and how to get a good portfolio together. Something I have never told anyone before is that my grandfather was a professional baseball player. He played for the NY Yankees in the late 40’s. My Father was a professional race car driver. He drove grand prix cars for Alpha Romeo (Pronounced: Roe-may-o) in the middle 60’s before and during his time as a soldier in Vietnam.

    My Father was an Air Commando in the Air Force, with the 311th Squadron. He was in a group that was the predecessor to the PJ’s – The Air Force Pararescuemen. You just about have to be a PJ to understand what his job was, but he was a sniper for the Air Force. He held a Crypto level Security Clearance. While a POW he was subjected to things that no human being should ever endure. I am so proud of my father that I wanted to take the time to share a little bit of his experience as a POW with you all.

    My dad was a good shot. His first experience with shooting a gun was with the Air Force during basic training. As he explained to me, he shot 99 out of 100 targets during his qualification trials. They asked him if he was a hunter and his answer was “No, I just listened to what the instructors told me”. This lead him down a path that put him in a position where he was one of the first members of a new Air Force special operations squadron… Called the Air Commandos. He did most of his initial training at Sheppard Air Force Base – where I have also been – back in 1966. From there they moved between Florida, California, and Louisiana for their training. Skip ahead almost a year (they were on a rapid training program) and he was in the thick of the war. He ended up spending 3 tours in Vietnam, and amazingly to me his time as a POW was not the end of his service.

    After a while as an Air Commando, he was tasked with training montenyards with tactics and strategies that they used. Normally, the Air Commando’s operated in smaller groups than the Navy Seals (who they cross-trained with)… Dad’s group operated in pairs of two. One was usually a demolition’s expert and the other was some type of weapons expert. In Dad’s case, they usually only sent him on espionage and/or assassination missions. This particular time they had two Air Commandos training 10 other Montenyards. During a particular fight, his squadron friend was killed. As a result of their heritage, the Montanyards didn’t follow dad’s orders and as a result his friend was killed by being left exposed to the firefight. The Montenyards gave up the fight and left dad alone against a platoon size force of viet cong. Dad was taken prisoner, and he was beaten so badly prior to arriving at his first camp that he has no recollection of what occurred after the Viet Cong surrounded him. He woke to find that many of the others had urinated on him, and in his open wounds. From there they forced him to do things like play Russian roulette, they shot others as he watched… they pried off his finger nails with bamboo sticks. They put him in the Chinese water torcher table…. and to describe some of his more difficult collections:

    Further along his time as a POW, they placed him and 6 others in a bamboo cage that was submerged in a river. Only about 6 inches of air separated them from the top of the cage. The cage was tall enough that you could not stand on the bottom. Your only choices were to swim or hang on to the bamboo door on top. Their cage was guarded 24/7, and if you started to hang onto the top of the cage they would take the butt of their AK-47s and smash your fingers until you let go. Dad said one of them had a finger cut off because he was too weak to let go, and the soldier’s constant beating on his hand caused his finger to be amputated. Then after the first few guys died (which they did not remove bodies from the cage) the mice started showing up and taking bites at those dead and undead in the cage. Dad was the only one to make it out alive. He was able to use some of the dead to help stand so he didn’t have to tread water. They were in that cage for about 2 weeks he said. Their feeding time consisted of rice being thrown into the water for them. As they moved dad from camp to camp they would first tie his hands together and each time he would trip they would tie… first his ankles together, and then if he tripped again they would tie his writs to his ankles… with his wrist being tied behind his back. He estimated that at one point they made him walk “duck” style for 10 miles. He said he could see the bones in his wrists and ankles from the rope digging in so much over that distance. He knew his “usefulness” was coming up as he was not far from the Hanoi Hilton, and that meant that they were going to kill him soon. While at his last POW camp, he made friends with several others. One was an Air Force Captain who flew F-105 ThunderCheifs. They would talk to each other, even though they couldn’t see each other. They were kept in cages that were around 4 feet tall by 3 feet wide… made from bamboo. They had one light in the top of them (no shade and they never turned them off). Dad said the two of them talked all the time about life back home… they even took beatings as a result of taking to each other, but it was worth it to them both.

    Fast forward ahead a little, and after Dad had an “interrogation” session – which involved unusually brutal beatings and burning, he saw an opportunity. For whatever reason they only sent one guard to take Dad back to his cage. Dad said the gaurd was only 18 or younger, but this was his only opportunity. So he saw the guard had a momentary lack of attention and he stepped behind him and broke his neck, killing him. He then took the key’s off of the guard’s body and went to unlock all of the other prisoners…. probably about 12-15 Dad said. They knew what they all had to do. They split into groups of two and all headed off in different directions, and since it was the middle of the night they knew they had fairly good odds of survival in smaller groups. Dad paired up with the Captain he had spent all that time talking to. They headed through the forest and walked/ran for a few days. Eventually they came to a road where they knew they could wait and take some transportation. The thing was they only had one gun, the one dad took from the guard he killed to break free. So, they figured that the Captain would take a position as a wounded person on the road and the first vehicle that came they would take, using the gun as necessary. First was a scooter with what was obviously a civilian and his wife/girlfriend…. but, this was a war and they had no choice. Dad shot each one and they took the scooter. Dad drove, and as he said he drove it as fast as it would go until it ran out of gas. Then they decided to stage things to look like an accident occurred when they ran out of gas. After a while, a truck showed up with about 5 people in it. Through a combination of hand-to-hand combat and use of what bullets were left, they took the truck. They did the same thing and ran it until it was out of gas. By this time they both had been living off of rice thrown on the dirt or in the water for the last month. When the truck ran out of gas they knew they were not far from the DMZ and knew they could walk the rest of the way. Their hunger was so intense that they started looking for anything that they could find. They happened to stumble across a patrol of 10 or so North Vietnamese. They didn’t care that they were out numbered, they were so hungry that they knew what they had to do. Unfortunately, the Captain didn’t listen to what dad told him as far as the tactic they would use to kill everyone. The Captain was so hungry that he jumped to action before he should have. As a result the Captain was shot in his leg. They did get the food they needed, but the Captain couldn’t walk anymore. So Dad did what he had too. He picked him up and threw him over his back. Dad walked for over 20 miles carrying the Captain. He continually talked with the Captain, because he knew what it meant if the Captain stopped chatting. Dad had formed a close bond with the Captain, and he promised the Captain he would get him back home to his family.

    Eventually, dad came upon an Army base, but he knew his friend needed urgent care. So instead of spending time going through the process of verifying who he was with a sentry, he snuck onto the base at night. Went straight to the infirmary, and gave his friend to the doctors….. who pronounced him dead. Dad knew it, he knew had had passed away about 10 miles before they got to the base, but he didn’t want it to end that way.

    Dad spent 3 days recovering before he went out on his next mission…. Which he was reprimanded for since his Squadron Commander, Col. White, forbid him from any activities until the Drs. cleared him for duty. He just couldn’t bear the fact that someone he cared for so much was killed by those who caused him so much pain to begin with. He just wanted to get back out and kill as many as he could. He served one more tour before becoming medically retired from the Air Force.

    Today, he still will wake up in the middle of the night screaming Mad Dog, the name of a friend. He still will just suddenly get the million mile stare if someone says something that triggers a memory from then. He is an amazing person…. Ask him what it was like and he will always answer the same way. It was a mental challenge, and that is all that he will say. Ask him how he made it through, and he will say that he spent the whole time building… part by part… his dream car…. Ask him about the Captain, and he walks away.

    His Commander was going to nominate him for the Medal of Honor for his actions. At that time, his Squadron was classified enough that his commander’s request was denied….. It would require an act of congress, and that would bring too much attention to his squadron. So dad earned a bronze star as a result of his actions…. because that was the highest award they could give that didn’t require congressional approval.

    I will post the letter that dad wrote to use kids about his time as a POW… to put his own words to his experience. I think it is something that others need to know about…. but I know my dad. He doesn’t care if anyone else knows what happened and he doesn’t care how others feel about what he did. He cared most about the Captain, and he couldn’t help him like he wanted.

    Whenever I get down or feel bad, I don’t have to look far at all for my encouragement. Maybe one day the government will recognize Dad. Currently, it requires presidential approval to obtain his military records. Sometimes I think about how proud of me he is, and I wonder if he realizes that it is I who am probably more proud to be an Albertson than he is of me.
    Posted by Bob Albertson at 6:36 PM”

  29. 2-17 Air Cav says:

    I don’t see anything that would allow the conclusion that this Veteran was a liar. The only source is the whacko son. Is it not a strong possibility that sonny boy made it all up and that the Veteran was not aware of any of it? Or am I missing something here?

  30. DownSouth says:

    He claimed to be an ex-POW and was recognized as such by the Vietnam Veterans Organization of Hot Springs, Ark. (see their Facebook page)

    https://www.facebook.com/hsvvo?fref=ts

  31. Piglet says:

    That story was hilarious. The dad “drove grand prix cars… before AND DURING his time as a soldier in Vietnam”?

    The dad was supposedly a pararescueman, but PJs weren’t ordinarily assigned to air commando (later redesignated special operations) squadrons. Such units were, by the way, flying outfits, not ground combat units. PJs weren’t employed as snipers, and they didn’t engage in training the locals as if PJs were taking over the role of Army SF teams. Also, the 311th Air Commando Squadron was by no means a top secret unit. An article in Wikipedia provides this mission description: “In Vietnam, the 311th flew cargo and passengers in support of I and II Corps. In addition, the unit flew flare, communications cover, air evacuation, and search and rescue missions for downed aircraft.” See:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/311th_Airlift_Squadron

    And of course, we have an escape story that is too wild even for a silly movie.

    I doubt the son made this up on his own. Ol’ dad threw together a phony-baloney story of derring-do with key words like sniper, air commando, POW, PJ, montagnards, etc., and the son believed it because (1) it was his dad and (2) he didn’t know any better.

  32. 2-17 Air Cav says:

    @32. FB is not reachable by me. Is the page something that is clearly attributable to the father or could it be sonny boy again.

    @33. Yeah, if the son were 11 or 12 I’d buy that but the little shaver is probably 40 or so.

  33. DownSouth says:

    Post from the VVO Facebook page:

    Vietnam Veterans Organization (VVO) of Hot Springs
    November 3
    It is with a sad heart that I have to make this post. Another one of our Brothers has departed this earth to be with the Lord. Tonya Albertson notified melast night that Jim passed away. He was such an asset for this Organization and was always eager to assist with anything that needed to be accomplished in order to keep this Org up and operating. As arrangements are made, I will provide updates for the upcoming service to Honor this Hero. He was a POW in Vietnam. Please keep the family in your prayers. Love you Bro!
    12115Like · · Share
    15 people like this.

    Karen Ward praying!
    November 3 at 11:41am · Like · 1

    Karen Dowling-Barth Prayers said for the family.
    November 3 at 11:42am · Like · 1

    Eunice Aldrich Robison prayers for all
    November 3 at 12:01pm · Like · 1

    Michelle Shroff Shuffield So sorry for this loss! Prayers for the family and friends.
    November 3 at 12:25pm · Like · 1

    Linda Murphy he will be greatly missed. Praying for Tonya and all their family & loved ones. Love you all!
    November 3 at 12:35pm · Like · 1

    Bob Albertson He was the best father and most amazing person I have known. We will forever miss him.
    November 3 at 12:38pm via mobile · Like · 2

    Bill Swope prayers going out to the family
    November 3 at 1:10pm · Like · 1

    Susie Damron Gower RIP Jim…praying for your family’s comfort and strength during these trying times.
    November 3 at 1:26pm · Like · 1

    Bill Schwartz Would they like the PGR to stand flag line at the funeral?
    November 3 at 2:57pm · Like · 1

    Bill Schwartz Will be praying for the family
    November 3 at 3:12pm · Like · 1

    Ruth Burks So sorry for the loss of your friend.
    November 3 at 6:24pm · Like · 1

    Jan Washburn So sorry to learn this. I do not know Jim Albertson, but I know many of the VVO folks and know this will be a very sorrowful time for all of you. May his heart be flying free.
    November 4 at 12:26am · Like · 1

    Vietnam Veterans Organization (VVO) of Hot Springs Five Purple Hearts and two Bronze Stars and an ex POW and past President of the VVO.
    November 4 at 6:13pm · Like

    Bob Albertson In case anyone would like to attend, we are having a visitation tomorrow from 6-8pm at Hot Springs Funeral home. We will have a celebration of life memorial service Wednesday at 2pm.
    November 5 at 8:58pm via mobile · Like · 1

    Vietnam Veterans Organization (VVO) of Hot Springs Jim Albertson received five Purple Hearts and two Bronze Stars and retired from the Military. And past President of the VVO.
    November 5 at 9:39pm · Like

  34. DownSouth says:

    @34
    It’s obvious that the father made these claims since he was a member of and past president of this organization (VVO). This man also has a “brick” at the Hot Springs Village Veterans Memorial which says ” Jim Albertson USAF Vietnam 1966-1969 EX POW” I will post it here but I have tried to but can’t figure out how to post a photo (help?). I have brought this brick to the attention of the Memorial committee. Waiting on a response.

  35. 2-17 Air Cav says:

    @35. Okay, thanks, DownSouth. I was hoping…

  36. DownSouth says:

    Here is a link to a Youtube video tribute (GodSpeed Capdad, Jim Albertson). Notice that there were 4 comments but now there are only 2 visible. Someone commented “NOT a POW” and Jeff Thomas commented “Yes, he was for 28 days” Jeff then decided to block that comment. I guess people will believe black is white if you say it long enough and loud enough. Sad…

  37. 2-17 Air Cav says:

    Well, he was a veteran race car driver and maybe he was taken hostage by a rival crew at one point and held for 28 days. Maybe the racing org also awards purple hearts for cuts and scrapes incurred doing engine work and bronze stars for drivers who thread the needle in daring fashion. Yeah, maybe.

  38. Hondo says:

    FOIA received on this individual. Bottom line: never set foot in Vietnam. Stories about being POW are pure BS. No personal decorations of any type – only service and unit awards (NDSM, AFOUA).

    Duty assignments were Lackland AFB; Sheppard AFB, and Athenai Airport, Greece. Retired for physical disability in 1969 after serving for a bit less than 3 years (Mar 1966 – Jan 1969).

    Will send Jonn a scanned copy of the FOIA tomorrow.

    I really wish assholes like this would think about how having their lies exposed after their demise will affect their survivors.

  39. Anonymous says:

    Did ANY of you ever meet this man?? IF what he said was lies, how does it affect you??? I am sure ALL of you are so freaking perfect that you have NEVER told a lie, or done anything you regreted!!!!!!!!!!!!! I guess by what I have read here that all of you are so bored with your life and have nothing better to do that to slam a man that is no longer on this earth! How does what he ever said (and not to any of you personally) affect your lives. You are all small minded people. I am Jim’s daughter and it SICKENS me to see all this posted, how would you feel if this was your family?? You can joke or whatever you need to do to make yourself feel better…..but remember this, our family has feelings, and I hope like hell none of you EVER have to see things like this posted on the internet about your loved one. My dad may not have been a perfect man, he was human, he made mistakes in life, again he was human, but he will always be perfect in my eyes NO MATTER WHAT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  40. NHSparky says:

    IF what he said was lies, how does it affect you???

    Might I suggest you pick up a copy of Burkett’s “Stolen Valor” and read it? Then you might begin (BEGIN!) to get an understanding of how people like this disgrace all of us who served.

    Sorry about your father, but he was still a liar. Period.

  41. Jonn Lilyea says:

    #41, we have feelings, too, don’t they count for anything? You can think whatever you want about him, so can we. Is this a great country, or what?

  42. reply_to_anonymous_daughter says:

    @41- By dredging up a dead thread, you have ensured that people who missed the story months ago have an opportunity to read about it.

  43. PintoNag says:

    @41 I don’t think the word ‘truth’ means what you think it means.

  44. Hondo says:

    anonymous (41): This is going to sound harsh, but I’m going to say it anyway: your father was a lying POS. I personally know people who served in Vietnam. Your father never went to Vietnam. The proof is posted on this site at

    http://thisainthell.us/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/ALBERTSON_FOIA_R_20121210.pdf

    Like your father, I also served in the military. Like your father, I was never a POW. Like your father, I never went to Vietnam. Like your father, I was no “war hero”.

    But unlike your father, I also never lied about any of the above. And unlike your father, I actually did serve in combat – though not in Vietnam, obviously.

    I’m sorry that your father turned out to be a lying POS. Reality bites sometimes.

    But the folks here aren’t the ones who lied to you for years. He lied to us, too.

  45. Veritas Omnia Vincit says:

    @41 I am sorry for your loss, but your anger is misplaced.

    No one here made up false stories about your father. He did that on his own, for whatever reasons. If anyone has tarnished the image of your father to you, it was your dad. He told you things about himself that were not true in any way, shape or form. Serving in Greece is hardly the same as being a POW in Vietnam, he should have told you that he served honorably during the war while not actually in Vietnam. He chose a different path, one that led you to this moment. No doubt a very sad moment for you as the guy who is your perfect father turns out to be something less than that.

    The lesson is that the truth tends to prevail over time, and our lies betray us. Especially to our loved ones.

    I wish you and your family nothing but the best moving forward, I hope you understand that no one here did anything but tell the truth. Something we all wish your father had done as well.

  46. Twist says:

    “how would you feel if this was your family??”

    I don’t have to worry about it because my father never pretended to ever have served.

  47. MCPO NYC USN (Ret.) says:

    41 Anonymous … Daughter of Valor Thief James R. Albertson

    In reference to your post on March 22nd, 2013 at 12:10 pm, you ask “did ANY of you ever meet this man”?

    I answer “yes I have”, to often and THEY are all the same.

    THEY travel through life like shopping in a cheap dollar store with a 100 dollar bill burning in their pocket.

    They lie to their family, civic organizations, politicians, and local authorities for purposes of greed or to fill a void in their character. In some cases it is a simple mental defect, but not often.

    In your father’s case, it is tragic, no one wants a parents legacy to be that of total disgrace and dishonor.

    But it is a total disgrace and dishonor … what your father did. And your attempt lesson us on this issue that we are all are most qualified to discuss, debate, and disect suggests that you do the issue and father’s memory no good.

    Any questions?

  48. reply_to_anonymous_daughter says:

    @30- Looks like this could be a family tradition. The claim that the grandfather played for the Yankees in the 40’s (obit only claims ‘professional baseball’ http://www.hsvvoice.com/news/2003-09-03/Obituaries/024.html), also appears to be false. No Albertson ever in the major leagues;

    http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/a/

    List of former major leaguers beginning with Alb:

    Gibson Alba 1988-1988
    Jonathan Albaladejo 2007-2012
    Joe Albanese 1958-1958
    Jose Alberro 1995-1997
    Matt Albers 2006-2012
    Butch Alberts 1978-1978
    Cy Alberts 1910-1910
    Gus Alberts 1884-1891
    Ed Albosta 1941-1946
    Ed Albrecht 1949-1950
    Jack Albright 1947-1947
    Al Alburquerque 2011-2012
    Vic Albury 1973-1976

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