Matthew Morton; O’Grady rescue phony

| September 6, 2016

800px-MortonBlackBelt

Mick sends us a link to our friends at Bushido – they expose martial arts phonies – and they came into contact with this Matthew Morton fellow who claims that he was part of the Scott O’Grady rescue in Bosnia among other things. Well, it turns out that Mick was a rotary-wing aircraft pilot during that operation and he has a roster of the 61 folks who were there, and *surprise*, Morton wasn’t on that roster – not that they’d take an artilleryman along with them.

Matthew Morton Assignments

Matthew Morton DD214

Matthew Morton FOIA

Matthew Morton operational participation

Apparently he told a lot of lies about his martial arts skillz, too, but that’s not in my wheelhouse.

Morton article

Category: Phony soldiers

Comments (98)

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  1. ChipNASA says:

    This is what happens when you’re not a black belt and a REAL black belt calls you on your shit.

  2. Combat Historian says:

    Claiming Scott O’Grady rescue is like claiming you were at DESERT ONE or at Koh Tang or at Mogadishu Black Hawk Down: everybody knows everybody in these tiny communities…high risk for no rewards…it ain’t worth it, posers…

  3. Ex-PH2 says:

    ‘He was never a member of the All-Marine Judo Team.’ – Bullshido

    That’s enough for me.

    But what do I know?

    • A Proud Infidel®™ says:

      NOT ONLY do the fine folks at Bullshido call him out on military embellishment, they do quite a detailed job of explaining why they threw the “BULLSHIT!” flag on his Martial Arts Certificates while explaining in detail why they say they’re basically Bernathian-level Photoshop work and they don’t hold back any punches, kicks, or chops!

  4. Animal says:

    I was an officer in India 3/8 and was on the Kearsarge that day. I wasn’t part of the TRAP that went ashore. I was part of the Bald Eagle (company sized reinforcement) that was loading helo’s to prepare for one of the 53’s being shot down. The TRAP was made up of the 81’s platoon. Since 81’s has their own FO’s I don’t think there would have been a need for an 0811 FO. The guy they brought back with them sure looked like Scott O’Grady to me.

    • Dave Hardin says:

      Exactly, the Bushido group is going to get a lot of blow back about their statements.

      Jonn often posts things sent to him by other groups. There is no way for people outside of the MEU and LF6F to understand how things actually work.

      This guy is probably full of shit, but his records show he did deploy on that operation. As I am sure you are aware it is common for Arty on the MEU’s to be deployed as grunts.

      I doubt he was on the actual teams that brought O’Grady out but probably participated in some back up roll…along with everyone else.

      The 3/10 unit designation is always a dead give away. The most deployed Battalion in the entire Corps. The entire Battalion was almost never at Camp Lejeune.

      The 24th MEU is and always was Special Operations Capable, even before there was a designation for it.

      The guy is probably full of shit, but he did earn an EGA and he was deployed on that operation. If he is claiming that he actually reached out and extracted O’Grady from enemy hands…Nah, no way, didn’t happen.

      • Mick says:

        Dave,

        I can personally confirm that Matthew Morton was definitely not on the O’Grady Rescue mission. I have the roster of all 61 Marines and Navy Corpsmen who flew off of the USS KEARSARGE (LHD-3) and penetrated 87 nautical miles into Bosnia-Herzegovina in order to rescue Captain Scott O’Grady on 08 June 1995, and Morton is not on that list. He was not a part of that rescue mission.

        Morton’s USMC records do indeed show that he was assigned to the artillery battery in 3/8 that was attached to 24th MEU(SOC) during that deployment during the summer of 1995 aboard USS KEARSARGE, but he was not part of the 24th MEU(SOC) Tactical Recovery of Aircraft and Personnel (TRAP) rescue team that went in to rescue Scott O’Grady. There were no Marine 0811 artillerymen serving in an 0311 role on the TRAP team.

        The 24th MEU(SOC) TRAP ground force on the O’Grady Rescue was composed of Marines from the 3/8 81mm mortar platoon, and they were led by 1stLt Martin Wetterauer. The 3/8 81mm mortar platoon was assigned TRAP duties as a collateral mission within 24th MEU(SOC). There were also Navy Corpsmen, a Marine who spoke Serbo-Croatian, Marine Communicators, and Command Element Marines assigned to the TRAP team during mission execution. Including the Marine pilots and enlisted aircrew (2 x CH-53E transport helicopters, 2 x AH-1W attack helicopters, and 4 x AV-8B attack aircraft), there was a total number of 61 Marines and Navy Corpsmen on the TRAP team. Again, none of them were Marine 0811 artillerymen serving in an 0311 role, and Morton certainly wasn’t among those 61 Marines and Corpsmen.

        In regards to his claims of participation in the O’Grady rescue, Morton is a confirmed phony.

        Semper Fi.

      • Animal says:

        We were taking the artie FO with the Bald Eagle. A 1st Lt and he had a couple of Marines with him. He may have been one of them but I can’t remember the names. I’ll have to look at my cruise book and see if he was in the at the battery.

    • Mick says:

      Animal,

      As noted in my post below, I have the roster of the 61 Marines and Corpsmen who were on the TRAP Team on that day.

      No 0811s, and definitely no Matthew Morton.

      Semper Fi.

      • Animal says:

        He wasn’t on the FO team from the battery attached to the Bald Eagle. I do see Dave’s point though. There were a lot of moving parts that morning. I’m not sure what the alert level of the other elements of the BLT were at the time, but the Kearsarge got active after the helo’s started getting hit. I’ve told people I was with the unit that participated in the rescue, but I’ve always been clear that I didn’t go ashore. Maybe he didn’t point that out. Maybe it was just assumed by someone listening that doesn’t know much about the military. Or even someone looking for more to beat on him about. There were approx 2,000 sailors and 1,000 Marines on the Kearsarge. Some of the sailors had no idea what was going on until they went to their duty station that morning. I’m not making excuses for him falsifying his black belt stuff, but the O’Grady stuff might be piling on. But then again, if he hadn’t of lied about the certificates people might not be looking for other lies.

        • Mick says:

          Animal,

          Here’s a newspaper article from the Southeast Missourian newspaper dated 30 March 1999, where Matthew Morton clearly claims that he ‘was in the helicopter that carried O’Grady to safety’.

          https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1893&dat=19990330&id=FocwAAAAIBAJ&sjid=1NwFAAAAIBAJ&pg=5721,4446058&hl=en

          Looks like he’s been telling this tall tale for quite a while.

          Semper Fi.

          • Animal says:

            Phook him then. He didn’t wait long to start telling that story.

            Cocksucker

          • Animal says:

            I went to the link. He was in fact in the FO team for the artie battery. He’s changed a lot since then and he wore Harry Potter glasses then also. Like someone said earlier, small world. I don’t remember much about the FO enlisted Marines, but I don’t remember any of them being problem children either. Maybe he caught the PTS in the well deck. We did have one Marine kill another Marine with a butterfly knife in the well deck earlier in the cruise. Maybe it was too much for him.

            • Dave Hardin says:

              Arty Forward Observer MOS is 0861. Little Morty here was a Gun Grape. As a LCpl he spent most of his time digging in trails and making ammo pits.

              Advanced party operations are a beast of a different nature. There were no Advance Party teams on this particular operation.

              Shitbirds like him prey on plausibility. Marines deployed as part of a BLT with the MEU’s can end up doing just about anything. An MOS does not really mean much.

              I wish there was a way for us to explain it better.

              • Animal says:

                Don’t know. Maybe they decided he was going to hump radios. The only one of the FO team I ever dealt with much was Lt. Ellinger, the 0802 FO. The rest were just kinda there looking for something to do when they were attached to India company.

              • Just An Old Dog says:

                Dave pretty much hit the nail on the head.
                MEU TRAP (Tactical Recovery of Aircraft and Pilot) teams were from the Battalion Landing Team.
                I have been on floats where the Artillery Battery was tasked with that, in this case, as stated above it wasnt the case.
                Also there would be no reason he would be part of an FO team. 0811 is a completely diffirent MOS. He was a Cannoneer Forward Observers are 0861s. An FO team usually consists of a 2nd or 1st Lt Artillery Officer MOS 0802, an Enlisted Forward Observer 0861 and two Radio Operators (at that time MOS 2531)
                Someone in the know already posted that he was not one of the 61 who went on the mission.

                • Animal says:

                  Like I said, I don’t know why he was on the FO team, but I’m almost certain he was. There’s a photo in the LF6F cruise book of the FO team and his goofy face. Maybe he got tagged with the radio. Like Dave said, those were the days of mixing and matching everything under the sun.

                  • Just An Old Dog says:

                    The only viable reason I could see him being with the FOs is if he was an “incidental driver”. While the FO teams were assigned to line companies the Battery also assigned an officer as Liason to the BLT to be in the Ops Center to help coordinate fires. This officer would have a SNCO 0861 with him, perhaps one or two FOs and RTOs.
                    They comprised the Liason Section. They also rated a vehicle and a driver. If Morton had a License and they needed him he could have been attached to them. It wasn’t that common, but possible.
                    I recall that the vast majority of our drivers in artillery batteries were not 3531s (Motor-T) but other MOSs who got licences.

                    • Dave Hardin says:

                      I just smile. Adapt and overcome. Yep, could have been a driver. The Gun Grapes are…well…different. Nonhackers, little fellas and anyone with menstrual cramps didnt last on the Gun Line.

                      FO’s were kinda bastard children anyway.

                • Dave Hardin says:

                  How about those MOS 9999 guys? Untrainable Staff NCO’s.

                  We tried to keep them contained in the old goats locker.

                  Semper Fi bro.

                  • Just An Old Dog says:

                    If I would have stayed in, vice retiring I would have loved to have went back to an Arty Battery as a First Sgt.
                    It would have been my luck to have been assigned to the 1st Egg-slapper and pecker-checker company MCB Camp Courtney Okinawa.

                    • Dave Hardin says:

                      Ahhh…to be the First Shirt. Beans, bullets, band aids, and bad guys.

                      I was so lucky. The ones I had were outfuckingstanding. Carl Layne at the top of the pile. He retired but I think they kept his eyebrow on active duty.

                    • Chip says:

                      Fire Mission!

  5. Mick says:

    Dave,

    I can personally confirm that Matthew Morton was definitely not on the O’Grady Rescue mission. I have the roster of all 61 Marines and Navy Corpsmen who flew off of the USS KEARSARGE (LHD-3) and penetrated 87 nautical miles into Bosnia-Herzegovina in order to rescue Captain Scott O’Grady on 08 June 1995, and Morton is not on that list. He was not a part of that rescue mission.

    Morton’s USMC records do indeed show that he was assigned to the artillery battery in 3/8 that was attached to 24th MEU(SOC) during that deployment during the summer of 1995 aboard USS KEARSARGE, but he was not part of the 24th MEU(SOC) Tactical Recovery of Aircraft and Personnel (TRAP) rescue team that went in to rescue Scott O’Grady. There were no Marine 0811 artillerymen serving in an 0311 role on the TRAP team.

    The 24th MEU(SOC) TRAP ground force on the O’Grady Rescue was composed of Marines from the 3/8 81mm mortar platoon, and they were led by 1stLt Martin Wetterauer. The 3/8 81mm mortar platoon was assigned TRAP duties as a collateral mission within 24th MEU(SOC). There were also Navy Corpsmen, a Marine who spoke Serbo-Croatian, Marine Communicators, and Command Element Marines assigned to the TRAP team during mission execution. Including the Marine pilots and enlisted aircrew (2 x CH-53E transport helicopters, 2 x AH-1W attack helicopters, and 4 x AV-8B attack aircraft), there was a total number of 61 Marines and Navy Corpsmen on the TRAP team. Again, none of them were Marine 0811 artillerymen serving in an 0311 role, and Morton certainly wasn’t among those 61 Marines and Corpsmen.

    In regards to his claims of participation in the O’Grady rescue, Morton is a confirmed phony.

    Semper Fi.

    • Dave Hardin says:

      Thanks Mick,

      Yes I understand that. As I am absolutely sure you understand there had been birds in the air before the actual rescue happened and after.

      I have no doubt he was not on the bird that rescued O’Grady. Great that we have access to that roster. It will not include all the Marines/Corpsman who were in the ready. I guess if they say they “participated” it would be hard to say they didn’t.

      I understand 0811’s are not generally seen as grunts. But, are Cobra guys actually pilots? (smile)

      • Mick says:

        Dave,

        Roger all. I’m certainly not trying to disparage or minimize the contributions of the Sparrow Hawk/Bald Eagle elements who were on standby back on the ship, nor anyone else who was out there who supported the TRAP mission. Everyone had an important role to play that day.

        However, there were only 61 Marines and Corpsmen from 24th MEU(SOC) on the TRAP team who actually crossed the beach and went feet dry into Bosnia-Herzegovina to get Scott O’Grady out of there on that day, and in the past 20+ years, I’ve met all 1000 of them.

        It gets tiresome after a while, ya know?.

        Semper Fi.

        • ChipNASA says:

          However, there were only 61 Marines and Corpsmen from 24th MEU(SOC) on the TRAP team who actually crossed the beach and went feet dry into Bosnia-Herzegovina to get Scott O’Grady out of there on that day, and in the past 20+ years, I’ve met all 1000 of them

          I see what you did there. LOL!!
          Great job Mick.

        • Dave Hardin says:

          I have met the other 1000. Ya, believe me brother it gets worse not better.

          There is almost not one day that goes by when one of the private groups I am in doesn’t have some idiot try to join.

          One group is from a small unit with only 48 people in it. There are 43 members in the group and the others are dead. That does not stop hundreds from trying to join.

        • HMC Ret says:

          We have today’s winner:

          “…I’ve met all 1000 of them.”

          A freaking classic. A keeper.

    • ChipNASA says:

      And BOOYAH. Game. Set and MATCH

  6. HMCS(FMF) ret says:

    Looks like the Bullshido guys did a real thorough background on MATTHEW MORTON, both on his martial arts and military background and broke his lies off in his ass like they did with “the third most dangerous man in the world”.

    Maybe they should set up a match between both of them so they can show of their skills in the art of cock block fu…

    Enjoy the fame and GOOGLE hits, MATTHEW MORTON!

  7. ex-OS2 says:

    Cocksucker.

    • IDC SARC says:

      There it is!

    • Holden Magroin says:

      Things not to think about when sucking prison cock

      “Didn’t he say that if I do this just once, he’d leave me alone from here on?”

      Holden

      • HMCS(FMF) ret says:

        “If the tip is the only part in, does that make me gay?”

        • John "Faker 6" Giduck says:

          Hey, some of us work for tips. Think it is easy head-bobbing all day long for 50 cents?

          sincerely

          John “Faker 6” Giduck

        • Holden Magroin says:

          One thing that I have learned over the years in that sometimes commas aren’t all that important. For instance, in this case, saying “Enjoy jail, dick” and “Enjoy jail dick” are both equally applicable.

          Holden

          • ex-OS2 says:

            Or perhaps, “Enjoy purple elephants, in jail” and “Enjoy purple elephants in jail” are one in the same.

        • Papago Joe says:

          You Drink to much fire water in bob wire hotel
          You hurt Papago Joes head and stomach and fire hole with comment
          YES IT MAKES YOU A LEFT FIELD’ER

  8. A Proud Infidel®™ says:

    Oh well, I still have MY Black Belts in Yakimandu, Egg Foo Yung and Chop Suey, my Chopsticks are the deadliest thing on Earth to anything on my plate! Matthew Morton can go Judo Chop himself a la Austin Powers.

  9. AverageNCO says:

    Okay, I have no idea who did or didn’t cross the line to rescue him in Bosnia. But I known exactly which 89th Dental Sqadron personnel took part in his overdue dental examination which was accomplished at Malcolm Grow Medical Center after his rescue. So there I was Man! My buddy who was nicknamed Stretch told him to bite down on the X-ray tab and stay closed till after the beep!
    Kidding aside, I really did help out on the dental checkup. Seriously? Who would make up a phony dental story?

  10. 2/17 Air Cav says:

    O’Grady got more mileage out of his being shot down than a NY cab does in a year.

    • Mick says:

      I’d like to respectfully request that we please do not take this discussion off on a tangent that leads to even more unfounded/uninformed criticism of Captain O’Grady. There has been more than enough of that kind of nonsense already over the last 20+ years.

      One of the completely unforeseen, and quite frankly sickening, consequences of the O’Grady Rescue was the way that United States military members (from all of the services) somehow found it necessary to quickly turn on Captain O’Grady following his successful E&E and subsequent rescue and then proceed to relentlessly criticize him ever since. The resultant unjustified institutional hatred and incessant mockery that have been directed at Captain O’Grady by his fellow servicemembers since 08 June 1995 has been nothing short of shameful.

      The Marines of the 24th MEU(SOC) TRAP team have heard everything from ‘he deserved to get shot down’ to ‘you should have left him out there’. And much worse. Such talk from so-called ‘military professionals’ is simply unfathomable. And disgusting. Marine TRAP teams do not hold a popularity contest before deciding to go in and rescue a fellow U.S. servicemember who is in harm’s way.

      For anyone who still feels compelled to continue to criticize and attack Captain O’Grady’s actions and performance, I would recommend that you consider and remember this:

      Captain Scott O’Grady was shot down on 02 June 1995 in a sophisticated SAM engagement that would have been difficult for anyone to avoid (and no, he did not have his radar warning gear turned off as some have erroneously theorized). He then successfully executed his escape and evasion plan for six consecutive days on the ground in hostile territory just southeast of the Serb stronghold of Bosanski-Petrovac, approximately 87 nautical miles deep inside Bosnia-Herzegovina, until picked up by the 24th MEU(SOC) TRAP team on the morning of 08 June 1995. To the best of my knowledge, there hasn’t been a successful U.S. military E&E event like that since the Vietnam War.

      So considering all of that, if anyone still feels justified in rolling in hot and trying to bad-mouth Scott O’Grady, I’m all ears.

      Semper Fi.

      • Dave Hardin says:

        There is always plenty of criticism to go around after these events. Hind sight and screams from the cheap seats never end.

        The MEU Commander and the BLT Commander both participated. Its a wonder any bird got off the deck with all the brass they were carrying.

        Those two got a ration of shit. O’Grady made mistakes and the rescue operation was less than perfect. Mistakes are always made and no operation is perfect.

        Had it been me instead of O’Grady the dogs would have tracked me right away from the stench of shit in my pants.

        Having been deployed in BLT 3/8 and the 24th MEU several times, I can say people who think they know what its like are clueless.

        Landing on a ship in the daytime is like sex, it’s either good or it’s great. Landing on a ship at night is like a trip to the dentist, you may get away with no pain, but nobody has to ask you to bite down.

      • 2/17 Air Cav says:

        I wrote one lousy line of about 20 words and, in response, you wrote a book, catapulting the discussion to a place you didn’t want to go. My line was based upon O’Grady’s movies, TV shows, at least two books, and God knows how many articles and TV/radio interviews. That’s all. And that’s a lot of mileage.

        • Mick says:

          OK. Maybe so.

          But to be fair, USAF PAO (under pressure from the Clinton Administration) pushed him into a lot of it, at least during late 1995 and into 1996. They were really trying to play it up as a “good news story” out of Bosnia-Herzegovina back when things weren’t going very well in there.

          That said, I don’t begrudge Captain O’Grady any of it.

  11. Hack Stone says:

    You should always bring along some artillery. They are like comm; You don’t need them, until you need them.

    • rgr769 says:

      Sometimes ops require working beyond the artillery fan. When you are outside the fan, an artillery FO is useless excess baggage. I think Cpt. O’Grady had the misfortune of being outside any friendly artillery fan. Even the big guns can only shoot so far. On the other hand maybe that mortar platoon brought a couple of tubes with them when they hit the ground; but I doubt it, since I know how heavy an 81mm tube and its baseplate are. Not something you want to hump on a quick in and out operation like this. Although, the 60mm would be doable; but I doubt an 81mm platoon would have them. We had a couple in my Ranger Co. in RVN, but I had a hell of a time getting ammo for them, as 60mm ammo was only authorized for the ARVN.

      • Mick says:

        Captain O’Grady was picked up approximately 87 nautical miles inside Bosnia-Herzegovina up near Bosanski-Petrovac, so yes, he was way outside of any friendly artillery/naval gunfire fan.

        The fire support plan for in and around the pick-up LZ was to use the Cobras and Harriers if required (there was a ground FAC with the TRAP ground force, and the Cobras were qualified as FAC(A)s). There was also a NATO CAS stack that was being built up and put on call as the mission progressed.

        As for mortars, I don’t remember precisely if the TRAP ground force took any along with them or not, but I don’t think so. Animal might remember.

        • Animal says:

          I am almost certain they didn’t take mortars. The Sparrow Hawk didn’t, but the Bald Eagle did. We were bringing the 60’s and at least one 81mm. May have been two. I don’t remember now. To be honest it kind of caught us off guard. The prevailing opinion the night before was that he had been killed or captured. We secured for the night with the consensus being we would secure and put all the gear we had staged in the hangar deck back up and partially stand down the next morning. Then early in the morning came the really loud 1MC broadcasting “Assemble the CAT in the PHIBRON war room” and it was on like donkey kong from there.

          • Mick says:

            Yup, everyone was starting to think that he had been killed/captured, until USAF Captain T. O. Hanford reported radio contact with O’Grady just after 0200 local time in the early hours of 08 June 1995.

            Then it was ‘game on’ aboard USS KEARSARGE.

          • Ex-PH2 says:

            Well, I’m not interested in stirring the pot on this, but I found this on Wiki. Don’t know how accurate it is, but still — spilling the beans to reporters?

            O’Grady delayed radioing for help, as the U.S. Air Force had taught him that downed pilots are often captured after calling for help too soon, giving away their position. On his 4th full day on the ground, he signaled his location using his radio’s limited battery power. NATO planes conducting sorties in the Balkans had been picking up beeper snippets that they thought could be coming from O’Grady.
            This extremely sensitive information was inadvertently revealed by General Ronald Fogleman, the Air Force Chief of Staff, when the general told reporters attending a promotion ceremony that monitors had detected “intermittent” transmissions.

            A NATO official was quoted as saying “I was dumbfounded he said that… I mean, why not just announce to the bad guys, ‘We think he’s alive and kicking, and we hope we find him before you do’?”

            If anyone besides Morton should be pounded on for doing or saying something stupid, center the argument around Fogleman.
            Per the Wiki article, O’Grady followed the training he got in his SERE course and waited several days before starting his transmitter.

    • NormanS says:

      Thank you. {Bows}

      31G30 (comm guy) in 1-143 Arty Bn, 40th ID (CA-ARNG).

  12. HMC Ret says:

    Hindsight is an exact science. Re the senior officers who felt the need to participate to, IMO, get their ‘creds’, I’m surprised the operation wasn’t delayed until the brass from the Pentagon could be rounded up so they, too, could participate.

    • SFC D says:

      Then it would’ve been scheduled to overlap the end of the month/first of the month in order draw the maximum amount of TDY, Per Diem, and Hostile Fire Pay.

      • Tony180a says:

        That was SOP after the first Gulf War. It seemed every IPC, MPC and FPC was planned to arrive in theater 30th or 31st of the month and conclude 1st or 2nd day of the following month. (Unless the location was a really high per deim rate then they’d stretch it a week) 2 months tax free and hostile fire pay

      • Skippy says:

        I thought that started in OIF 04-05 the new rules about 30 days boots on sand we had a three star that would hang with us and then disappear and show up bye the end of the 30 day period rumor had it he would disappear to Qatar or Kuwait city but never verified

    • Ex-PH2 says:

      What I get out of this discussion rerouted from the real subject (Morton) is that a bunch of egos decided they were going to stick their oar into the water so that they could say BTDT.

      That’s not something new. And obviously, Morton thought he could capitalize on it, too, and get away with it.

      • Graybeard says:

        I have read accounts from ‘Nam where some brass wanted to get some recognition and had a LRRP or someone similar find a sampan with some Cong, kill the Cong, float the sampan into the river, and let the brass shoot up the boat, reporting a major engagement.

        I know there were similar activities in WWII.

        There are, despite out best effort, posers in all the armed forces.

        • Ex-PH2 says:

          Yes, as you may recall, someone named Kerry had his ‘day’ and then went back to the US and complained about it, then milked it for everything he could get later on.

          • Graybeard says:

            There y’dun gone and got my BP up again…
            Him and Hanoi Jane need to take a fact-finding trip to the bottom of the Marianas Trench together…

            The incident I’m vaguely remembering reading about was either recounted in “Good To Go” or one of the collections of stories from some of the LRP-LLRP vets. But probably someone like Kerry.

            • Graybeard says:

              “Good To Go” was by Harry Constance.
              Can’t remember who collected the LRP/LRRP stories…

              • A Proud Infidel®™ says:

                I’ve read two good books written by 101st ABN LRPs in Vietnam, one is “Eyes of the Eagle and the other is “Death in the A Shau Valley”, written by Gary Linderer and Larry Chambers (Hope I got the names right!).

                • rgr769 says:

                  Linderer’s name is correct. I met him at a reunion we did jointly with Lima Company at Ft. Campbell over fifteen years ago. He was also a publisher/editor of the magazine “Behind the Lines.”

          • jonp says:

            If your not in you can always corkscrew in and run off the tarmac under sniper fire like Hillary

        • Silentium Est Aureum says:

          You want WWII stories?

          Look up how LBJ “earned” his Silver Star.

          • rgr769 says:

            Yes. I’ve read about that one. It is right up there with the true account of how “Lurch” won his Silver Star.

        • A Proud Infidel®™ says:

          My Platoon did Convoy Escort while I was in A-stan. While we had plenty of legit missions we also had out fair share of hauling “Medal Hunters”, Field Grade Officers that would have us take them through some pretty hairy places like Khyber Pass where ambushes were likely in hopes something would happen and they could put themselves in for say, a Silver Star. One such run was to go to Jalalabad (J-bad)to pick up a Soldier who had just received a Red Cross message and get him back to camp in Kabul. We never got to J-bad (NO Combat Action, some Chinese contractors had a piece of the road dug up and it was impassable)but said FG merely said “Nothing this time, looks like we’ll have to just send a bird to go get him.”. We had a few times like that when we KNEW we were simply hauling a “Medal Hunter” around, the sonofabitccockwasasswipemotherfuckers risked OUR asses just to pad their dress uniforms! We did a fair share of very legit missions and I had no quips or qualms with those.

          • rgr769 says:

            I had one Bn CO in RVN that used to shanghai the Bn’s daily resupply Huey for his aerial recons of the AO when he couldn’t get a LOH (the mil version of the Hughes 500). The arrogant bastard would piss off the Huey crew, and they would invent a mechanical problem that required a return to base. Then the line companies in the field, including mine, would not get their scheduled resupply of C-rats, water & mail. I think he (the LTC)was working on another award of the Air Medal. He was so popular there was a rumor that there was a bounty on him of several thousand dollars. He was relieved after 4 months in command and assigned to one of the 4th ID support Bns.

  13. Green Thumb says:

    Maybe they took him along to drop some charges in a two-hole?

  14. Skippy says:

    Every body wants to be a Hero until it’s time to do hero shit

  15. Green Thumb says:

    This dude could not kick his way out of a wet sack of shit.

    Maybe he should contact “Ranger” Stephen Burrell for some advice.

  16. mr. sharkman says:

    Bullshido handles military frauds that cross into their AO very seriously. In a couple of cases involving phony Teamguys they have been nothing but cooperative and respectful when dealing with Teamguys who wound up ‘working’ with them in their investigations.

    I recall them being the same way with Army SF and other SOF.

    Look up Ralph Hall, phony Ranger and fake Bujinkan (Ninpo Taijitsu – last of the guys who can claim lineage to real-deal ‘ninja’ from the days of feudal Japan) instructor.

    Everything going on during and around the shoot down, E&E, and eventual rescue of O’Grady was a lot more complicated and fluid and frustrating than most realize, so all that fog and chaos is of course not remembered by most.

    French SOF and NSW tried to get to him on 2 separate occasions, to no avail. There were other attempts that didn’t get reported on, and probably never will.

    Those who were quick to criticize, as usual, lacked any significant 1st hand experience when it came to relevant missions/ops/etc.

    And the ‘certainty’ that existed afterwards that an American would be actually treated as a POW did not exist during the time of the shoot down, E&E, and eventual rescue. To the contrary, there were plenty of briefs stressing the splinter/faction angle of the various groups fighting for the same side.

    If O’Grady was having nightmares of seeing himself winding up in a shallow grave or added into a mass grave because his custody was a can of worms some local combat group leader didn’t want to think about opening, his nightmares weren’t fantasy based – they were reality based.

    Good on him and good on the Marines involved.

    If some military Pilot who was shot down and executed a successful E&E in hostile territory wants to critique him, well he’s earned the right. Everyone else who was running their suck about O’Grady at the time…not so much.

  17. Otto says:

    Here’s an aspect of the story you likely haven’t heard and don’t worry, nothing I’m saying here is classified: I was temporarily assigned to the Combined Air Ops Center in Aviano when Captain O’Grady got shot down. What I quickly discovered is that his flight lead, Captain Bob Wright, the previous year had shot down three Serbian Soko Galeb’s in what has become known (at least on Wikipedia) as the Banja Luka incident. Without getting into all the details, but the most important being all the “tailplane watchers” off the runway at Aviano, it became clear to me that this was actually a SAM trap established to shoot down Wright. My theory was actually leaked and written about in the media back then, not from me, I can assure you. I have never met O’Grady but mutual friends told him my theory and I have heard he agrees. Just a little known story.

  18. HT3 '83-'87 says:

    Is it just me, or does everybody else know a guy is full of shit when he starts off with…

    “I was on a special/classified/top secret deployment to Krablackistan…then we had 25, no, 50 enemy KIA’s…then I got home and fucked the ex-prom queen, no the whole court…”

    The few real combat vets that I met weren’t to forthcoming about too many details except they “did what had to be done to complete the mission and bring our people home” or something close to that…

    Even this REMF knows pure bullshit when he hears it, so save it all you posers.

  19. Just An Old Dog says:

    Read about his exposure within the Martial Arts Community over at Bushido.
    This guy was a forging, lying sack of shit.He faked all kinds om MA documents. I’m surprised he didnt try to doi the same with his service