Rear Admiral: Mid-Atlantic Bases Are Ready For Florence

| September 13, 2018 | 22 Comments

flo winds

AUSTIN, Texas — Navy Region Mid-Atlantic is ready for the Hurricane Florence, said Rear Adm. Charles Rock, the region’s commander.
With about 300,000 servicemembers, family members, reservists and retirees in the storm’s path, he said they are “taking it very seriously” as they prepare for the storm projected to strike the East Coast of the United States by Saturday morning.
“Our focus is first on safety of our assets and safety of our personnel. As soon as the storm passes and we have the opportunity to ensure our facilities are safe and personnel are safe, roadways are safe, we’ll open our installations again to get back to training and readiness,” Rock said.
As of Wednesday, the Navy ordered evacuations for low-lying portions of Naval Station Norfolk in Virginia and 11 counties of North Carolina in conjunction with evacuation orders issued by those states.
In Virginia, Rock said much of the Navy’s facilities are outside the evacuation area, known as flood zone A. He said one portion of the base in Virginia Beach susceptible to flooding and wind damage is Dam Neck Annex, where about 1,400 sailors and family members live. They were moved Wednesday.

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  1. NHSparky says:

    They’re also evacuating the baby nukes out of Goose Creek to (IIRC) Ft. Jackson.

  2. Fyrfighter says:

    Funny connection, My little brother trained at Goose Creek, and I’ve got a good friend at Ft. Jackson..

  3. 5th/77thFA says:

    Sortie and scatter before the winds, heading north by north east @ flank speed? How far out they gotta go to be out of the “zone”? How long will it take to get to a “safe spot”?

    • NHSparky says:

      During Hugo, the USS Narwhal couldn’t get underway, so they submerged at the pier.

    • AW1Ed says:

      Actual flank speeds are classified, advertised is 30+ kts, about 34.5 mph.

      While this isn’t me in the pic, on the rotor head helping the maintainers fold the blades, it sure could have been.
      H-2 High Seas

      • 5th/77thFA says:

        Good stuff here & thanks swabbies. Figure they can’t/aren’t going to maintain flank speed too long, just kinda tricky trot along at 20 – 25 kts, head out toward the deep water, using the charts of the projected coverage and ride it out. Head back in following the rear of the storm. Would figure it’s way yonder rougher on the surface boys than the bubble heads. Don’t think I’d like to ride out a storm in a sub, submerged at the dock in really shallow water. And damn sure would not want any thing at all to do with flight ops. Those cats in the WC130Js flying into that? No thank you. My boys aren’t that big and/or brassy.

      • 5th/77thFA says:

        45 years ago, maybe, probably. Now? Oh hellz to the nix, nein, nacho fool, NO WAY!

  4. pointyhead says:

    When did the Navy move their mid-Atlantic region HQ to Austin, Texas? I didn’t know the Colorado River had deep water access. The last Navy I saw there (I was at Bergstrom for 4 years) was the Old Navy store on Ben White Blvd. Ha!

  5. A Proud Infidel®™️ says:

    I’m sure that the hospitals on those bases will see a big surge in births come April!

  6. Ex-PH2 says:

    According to Accuweather’s radar map, the outer rain band of Florence is on the coast of North Carolina now, at 8:15PM EDT.

    Prayers up for anyone who in in its way.

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