Navy sailor struck by propeller

| September 23, 2018 | 28 Comments

e-2c hawkeye

Last week, Mick brought us the sad news of a death onboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush, while conducting routine flight operations in the Atlantic ocean. The Navy has released the Sailor’s name and the cause of death.

A sailor who died aboard an aircraft carrier in the Atlantic Ocean during routine flight operations on the flight deck was struck by the turning propeller of a plane, the U.S. Navy said.

The Navy said in a statement on Wednesday that Airman Apprentice Joseph Naglak had just secured an E-2C Hawkeye radar plane to the flight deck.

Naglak’s death occurred Monday aboard the USS George H.W. Bush in the Atlantic. The aircraft carrier was supposed to go to sea for training along with 30 other warships, and Hurricane Florence moved up the date a few days earlier.

The Navy said the incident remained under investigation.

The flight deck of an aircraft carrier has been described as one of the most dangerous places on earth. Fair winds and following seas, Airman Apprentice Naglak.

The entire article may be viewed Here.

Category: Navy

Comments (28)

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  1. Ex-PH2 says:

    Damn! ALWAYS BE AWARE OF AIRCRAFT ENGINES. They will kill you if you make even one tiny mistake. The flight deck is unforgiving and dangerous.

    Fair winds and following seas, AA Naglak.

    • Garold says:

      Yeah, no shitte. Airfields are inherently dangerous areas.

      I used to teach the folks about such dangers. In the first Gulf war the first casualty was on the flightline. When Afghaniland started the first casualty was on the flighline.

      That’s a bad way to get knocked out the action and makes it hard for the wife to tell the grandkids later in life how the pops went out during “the war”.

    • call the cavalry.... i show up says:

      This comment is inappropriate and has been removed. If there are any objections, feel free to email me at AW1Ed.doesntcare.

  2. RIP Sailor. I remember the OKIE 3 had large letters on the island that said beware of props.

  3. Sparks says:

    Rest in peace Brother. God be with your family.

  4. MustangCryppie says:

    One of the safety cautions pounded into my head when I was aircrew:
    STAY THE FUCK OUT OF THE PROP ARC.

    Even if you passed through the prop arc when the engine was shut down, you were sure to get your ass REAMED. The logic was if you buiit a habit when it was safe, you’ll fall back on that habit when under pressure…with very bad results.

    RIP, shipmate.

  5. AW1Ed says:

    Even if you passed through the prop arc when the engine was shut down, you were sure to get your ass REAMED.

    Yeah, buddy. I was a salty AW3 and the bird was in the hanger. Took a short cut between the number three and four props, and proceeded to get my ass reamed by the Maintenance Chief, loudly and at length.
    My lesson learned, and everyone else in hearing distance as well. Exactly as the Chief intended.

  6. Inbred Redneck says:

    This is one Dad who was always worried ’cause my daughter spent most of eight years workin’ on C2Greyhounds, same-same Hawkeye, less the radar and with plenty of cargo capacity.
    RIP sailor.

  7. 5th/77thFA says:

    Airman Apprentice, would that mean he was a semi FNG, not fully trained up yet? Got an adopted nephew serving on the Carl V now. Crawled his ass about watching his ass on deck at all times before he shipped out to report. He commented that the instructors at Great Lakes had pounded that into their heads, but there was always one that wasn’t paying attention. RIP AA Naglak. Peace unto your Family and Shipmates.

    • AW1Ed says:

      Airman Apprentice- E-2, very junior. No Rating specified, so I’m assuming undesignated, and getting trained to work ‘chocks and chains’ on the flight deck. I’m sure he was briefed over and again on the dangers of prop arcs, jet intakes and jet blast, but it only takes a second of inattention for very bad things to happen.
      Condolences to his family and friends, and I know his shipmates are hit very hard, and are deep in the “But if I only…” game.

      Edit, the obit states he was an Aviation Boatswains Mate Airman Apprentice, or ABAA.

      • 5th/77thFA says:

        Thanks Brother, ’bout what I figured. Sad song though. Like a lot of jobs, 100 things can happen and 96 of those things are not good. Had a buddy that was on the Forrestal when the SHTF. He never liked McCain either.

    • desert says:

      Seems like there is at least one on every cruise…we had a sailor in the reefer on our cruise that had walked into a propeller! Sad thing!

  8. Ken.T. says:

    R.I.P, Sailor. May your journey be safe and full of rest.

  9. NHSparky says:

    …routine flight operations…

    No. Such. Fucking. Animal.

    RIP, sailor.

  10. Atkron says:

    I was a PC on A-7’s during my first cruise. They were nicknamed the maneater. I was more afraid for the E-2’s and C-2’s than any other aircraft on deck.

    I was always grateful that they were usually the first off the deck.

  11. HMC Ret says:

    Rest in Peace, Brother

  12. HMC Ret says:

    I can determine the nature of the eliminated comment based on the respondents’ messages. So happy you served (if you did) in an environment that was completely void of potential dangers. If you plan to return to this site, clean up your act. Finding humor in the mishap of a military member, particularly mishap that results in death, is not the way to demonstrate anything but fucking stupidity. You’re an idiot.

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